Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship

The Teaching Fellowship is an opportunity for students who want to use their math or science knowledge with the young people who need them most.

For top applicants, this prestigious Fellowship offers a generous stipend ($30,000) toward completion of a master’s degree program at a Woodrow Wilson partner institution in Georgia. Fellows prepare through a yearlong clinical experience in a local high-need school, along with rigorous subject matter courses, then commit to teach for three years in urban or rural secondary schools, with mentoring throughout the entire process.

To learn more about what WW Teaching Fellows get out of the program, watch this short video.

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program Workshops

Preparing an NSF-GRFP Fellowship Application Workshop Series

The Graduate School is running a series of workshops designed to help UW-Madison senior undergraduates and graduate students in the early stages of their graduate studies prepare a competitive application for the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program. To learn more about the GRFP fellowship visit www.nsfgrfp.org.

FELLOWSHIP BENEFITS:

  •  Five year fellowship period with three years of financial support
  • Annual stipend of $34,000
  • Cost of Education allowance of $12,000 to the institution
  • Professional development opportunities (GRIP and GROW)
  • XSEDE supercomputer access for Fellows and honorable mentions
  • No service requirement
  • Access to supplemental funding to sustain research while on medical deferral (e.g. maternity/paternity leave)

To register for these workshops visit the Graduate School website:  https://grad.wisc.edu/studentfunding/workshops/

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Application Overview and Fellows Panel
Date: Thursday, September 7, 2017
Time: 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Location: Auditorium, Biotechnology Center, 425 Henry Mall

This workshop is intended to be an informational session about applying to the National Science Foundation GRFP. It will give an overview of the application to provide prospective applicants (i.e. senior undergraduates or graduate students in the biological, physical, or social sciences) an idea of the amount of work involved and where to start. There will also be a panel of current fellows who will be able to answer questions about the process.

Writing Fellowship/Grant Applications
Date: September 14, 2017
Time: 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Helen C. White Hall, Room 6191

This workshop will provide an outline of the fellowship application writing process. We will cover how to take into account argument, organization, and style in preparing a fellowship application. We will also discuss how to adapt written applications to different funding audiences.

NSF GRFP Faculty Reviewers Panel
Date: Wednesday, September 27, 2017
Time: 4:30 – 6:00 p.m.
Location: Union South, Northwoods

This panel will feature faculty members who have served as reviewers for the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program competition. They will share insights about the review process and tips on how to make your application more successful.

NSF Application Broader Impacts Workshop: How to Address the Broader Impact in Your Fellowship Application
Date: Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Time: 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Location: H.F. DeLuca Forum, Discovery Building

The National Science Foundation (NSF) employs two criteria in the review of Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) applications, namely intellectual merit and broader impact. Experience shows that while most applicants have little difficulty responding to the criterion relating to intellectual merit, many struggle to frame the broader impacts of the activities they propose to undertake. To address the broader impacts, applications are expected to include ways in which activities and projects will advance discovery and understanding, broaden the participation of underrepresented groups, enhance the infrastructure for research and education, and ultimately benefit society. This workshop is designed to help you address the concept of broader impacts in your fellowship application, and specifically is a time for you to discuss strategies for writing a successful broader impact plan, hear from panelists about successful fellowship proposals, and learn about resources on campus focused on effective integration of research and education.
For more information contact: Irina Diaz, Fellowship, Funding and Diversity Initiatives Coordinator, Irina.diaz@wisc.edu, 608-890-0738

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Information Session

If you are an undergraduate senior or a graduate student in your first or second year of graduate school, we invite you to attend the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) Information Session on Tuesday, August 22, 2017. This session will be facilitated by Dr. Benjamin Marquez who has served as a reviewer for the NSF GRFP competition. Dr. Marquez will provide an overview of the application process and will share tips on how to make your application more successful. The event will be held in the Auditorium at the UW-Madison Biotechnology Center from 4:00 – 5:00 PM. Follow this link to register: NSF GRFP Information Session August 2017

The GRFP is a prestigious, nationally competitive fellowship offered by the National Science Foundation. The NSF Graduate Research Fellowships are awarded to individuals in the early stages of their graduate study. Fellows are free to use their Fellowship at any university, college, or non-profit academic institution of higher education accredited in, and having a campus located in, the United States, its territories, or possessions, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico that grants a graduate degree in STEM fields.

FELLOWSHIP BENEFITS

  • Five year fellowship period with three years of financial support
  • Annual stipend of $34,000
  • Cost of Education allowance of $12,000 to the institution
  • Professional development opportunities (GRIP and GROW)
  • XSEDE supercomputer access for Fellows and honorable mentions
  • No service requirement
  • Access to supplemental funding to sustain research while on medical deferral (e.g. maternity/paternity leave)

For more information about the GRFP, visit: https://www.nsfgrfp.org/.

For questions about the session, please contact:

Irina Diaz
Fellowship, Funding and Diversity Initiatives Coordinator
Office of Fellowships and Funding Resources
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Irina.diaz@wisc.edu
608-890-0738

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Information Session

If you are an undergraduate senior or a graduate student in your first or second year of graduate school, we invite you to attend the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) Information Session on Tuesday, July 18, 2017. This session will be facilitated by Dr. Andrew Greenberg who has served as a reviewer for the NSF GRFP competition. Dr. Greenberg will provide an overview of the application process and will share tips on how to make your application more successful. The event will be held in the Auditorium at the UW-Madison Biotechnology Center from 4:00 – 5:00 PM. Follow this link to register: NSF GRFP Summer 2017 Information Session

The GRFP is a prestigious, nationally competitive fellowship offered by the National Science Foundation. The NSF Graduate Research Fellowships are awarded to individuals in the early stages of their graduate study. Fellows are free to use their Fellowship at any university, college, or non-profit academic institution of higher education accredited in, and having a campus located in, the United States, its territories, or possessions, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico that grants a graduate degree in STEM fields.

FELLOWSHIP BENEFITS

  • Five year fellowship period with three years of financial support
  • Annual stipend of $34,000
  • Cost of Education allowance of $12,000 to the institution
  • Professional development opportunities (GRIP and GROW)
  • XSEDE supercomputer access for Fellows and honorable mentions
  • No service requirement
  • Access to supplemental funding to sustain research while on medical deferral (e.g. maternity/paternity leave)

For more information about the GRFP, visit: https://www.nsfgrfp.org/.

If you have any questions about the session, please contact:

Irina Diaz
Fellowship, Funding and Diversity Initiatives Coordinator
Graduate School|Office of Fellowships and Funding Resources
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Irina.diaz@wisc.edu
608-890-0738

Fulbright Workshops

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program (FUSP) 2018-19 is open and we will be having two workshops next week!

On Tuesday, the UW-Madison’s Writing Center is hosting:

Writing Your Way to a Fulbright: The Application Process
Tuesday, April 25
3:30-5:00pm
Helen C. White Hall
Register @ http://writing.wisc.edu/Workshops/Application_Fulbright_essay.html

On Wednesday, Mark Lilleleht, the campus Fulbright Program Advisor, will hold a general information session:

FUSP Information Session
Wednesday, April 26
2:30-3:30pm
206 Ingraham Hall

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program is open to undergraduates graduating in December 2017 or May 2018, currently enrolled graduate students, and alumni. Applicants to the Fulbright U.S. Student program must be U.S. citizens.

Full details on the campus process (and deadlines) are available @ http://go.wisc.edu/fusp

If you cannot make a session but would like to learn more, please contact Mark Lilleleht @ awards@iris.wisc.edu to set up an appointment (skype appointments for those abroad are also encouraged).

Research Fellowships

One of the things we value most about UW-Madison is our success in supporting and involving undergraduates in collaborative research.  This is an important high-impact educational practice that can enrich the Wisconsin Experience for undergraduates.  The Provost’s Office is especially pleased to announce that scholarships and fellowships are available to encourage and support that work.

Applications are available via the websites listed below.  Questions may be directed to Julie Stubbs, Director of the Undergraduate Academic Awards Office (6 Ingraham Hall, 265-2428, awards@provost.wisc.edu).

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS support undergraduate research done in collaboration with UW–Madison faculty or research/instructional academic staff. Approximately 15 awards are available, funded by grants from the Brittingham Fund and the Kemper K. Knapp Bequest. The student researcher receives $2,500, and the faculty/staff research advisor receives $500 to help offset research costs (e.g., supplies, faculty or student travel related to the project). At the time of application, the student must be a sophomore, a freshman who will have more than 24 credits after May 2017, or a transfer student in their first year of attendance at UW-Madison. The application deadline is February 27, 2017. Directions for accessing the on-line application, eligibility and selection criteria can be found at the UAA website.
< http://awards.advising.wisc.edu/sophomore-research-fellowship/ >

HILLDALE UNDERGRADUATE/FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS AND
HOLSTROM ENVIRONMENTAL SCHOLARSHIPS provide support for collaborative research between undergraduate students and faculty or research/instructional academic staff members.  Each provides a grant of $3,000 to the student and $1,000 to the faculty/staff mentor to help offset research costs. Students must have at least junior standing at the time of application. The Holstrom Scholarships require an environmental focus. The McPherson Eye Research Institute will continue to sponsor one additional Hilldale Fellowship for vision based research (including bioengineering, imaging, data visualization, ophthalmology and general biology of the eye). The application deadline is February 13, 2017. Directions for accessing the on-line application, eligibility and selection criteria, and FAQs can be found at the UAA website.
< http://awards.advising.wisc.edu/hilldale-undergraduatefaculty-research-fellowship/ >
< http://awards.advising.wisc.edu/holstrom-environmental-scholarship/>

WISCONSIN IDEA UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS are awarded to undergraduate students to develop and implement community-based research or service-learning projects that will meet a community identified need (local, national or international) under the supervision of a UW-Madison faculty or instructional academic staff member. Fellowships provide three (3) academic credits, a stipend of up to $3,000 to a student ($5,000 for a group of up to five students) and up to $2,000 to help offset project related costs. The application deadline for 2017-18 fellowships is February 10, 2017. The on-line application, instructions and FAQs can be found on the Morgridge Center for Public Service website.
< http://morgridge.wisc.edu/students-wisconsin-idea-fellowships.htm >

UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARDS provide $1,000 to undergraduate students who have distinguished themselves by completing outstanding projects, such as a senior thesis, at UW-Madison.  Students must be enrolled in a degree program during the 2016-17 academic year (December 2016 graduates may apply).  Applications are due March 8, 2017.  Directions for accessing the on-line application, eligibility and selection criteria can be found at the UAA website.
< http://awards.advising.wisc.edu/university-book-store-award/ >

Research Fellowships

One of the things we value most about UW-Madison is our success in supporting and involving undergraduates in collaborative research.  This is an important high-impact educational practice that can enrich the Wisconsin Experience for undergraduates.  The Provost’s Office is especially pleased to announce that scholarships and fellowships are available to encourage and support that work.  Note that in some cases the faculty/staff mentor may also receive funds to support the collaborative research effort.

Applications are available via the websites listed below.  Questions may be directed to Julie Stubbs, Director of the Undergraduate Academic Awards Office (2109 Nancy Nicholas Hall, 265-2428, awards@provost.wisc.edu).

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS support undergraduate research done in collaboration with UW–Madison faculty or research/instructional academic staff. Approximately 15 awards are available, funded by grants from the Brittingham Fund and the Kemper K. Knapp Bequest. The student researcher receives $2,500, and the faculty/staff research advisor receives $500 to help offset research costs (e.g., supplies, faculty or student travel related to the project). At the time of application, the student must be a sophomore, a freshman who will have more than 24 credits after May 2017, or a transfer student in their first year of attendance at UW-Madison. The application deadline is February 27, 2017. Directions for accessing the on-line application, eligibility and selection criteria can be found at the UAA website.
< http://awards.advising.wisc.edu/sophomore-research-fellowship/ >

HILLDALE UNDERGRADUATE/FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS AND
HOLSTROM ENVIRONMENTAL SCHOLARSHIPS provide support for collaborative research between undergraduate students and faculty or research/instructional academic staff members.  Each provides a grant of $3,000 to the student and $1,000 to the faculty/staff mentor to help offset research costs. Students must have at least junior standing at the time of application. The Holstrom Scholarships require an environmental focus. The McPherson Eye Research Institute will continue to sponsor one additional Hilldale Fellowship for vision based research (including bioengineering, imaging, data visualization, ophthalmology and general biology of the eye). The application deadline is February 13, 2017. Directions for accessing the on-line application, eligibility and selection criteria, and FAQs can be found at the UAA website.
< http://awards.advising.wisc.edu/hilldale-undergraduatefaculty-research-fellowship/ >
< http://awards.advising.wisc.edu/holstrom-environmental-scholarship/>

WISCONSIN IDEA UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS are awarded to undergraduate students to develop and implement community-based research or service-learning projects that will meet a community identified need (local, national or international) under the supervision of a UW-Madison faculty or instructional academic staff member. Fellowships provide three (3) academic credits, a stipend of up to $3,000 to a student ($5,000 for a group of up to five students) and up to $2,000 to help offset project related costs. The application deadline for 2017-18 fellowships is February 10, 2017. The on-line application, instructions and FAQs can be found on the Morgridge Center for Public Service website.
< http://morgridge.wisc.edu/students-wisconsin-idea-fellowships.htm >

UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARDS provide $1,000 to undergraduate students who have distinguished themselves by completing outstanding projects, such as a senior thesis, at UW-Madison.  Students must be enrolled in a degree program during the 2016-17 academic year (December 2016 graduates may apply).  Applications are due March 8, 2017.  Directions for accessing the on-line application, eligibility and selection criteria can be found at the UAA website.
< http://awards.advising.wisc.edu/university-book-store-award/ >

2017 Farm and Food Education Fellowship

Growing Food, Building Community
AMI Fellowship Program: 2017 Applications Available

Allegheny Mountain Institute (AMI) is seeking inspiring individuals to participate in the sixth cohort of our Farm and Food Education Fellowship. The 18-month Fellowship prepares and empowers individuals to become teachers and ambassadors for a more vibrant and accessible local food system. Selected Fellows are funded to spend six months in immersive training on our farm campus (Phase I) and one year in service work with relevant partner organizations (Phase II). The Fellowship is a program of AMI, an educational non-profit organization with the mission to cultivate healthy communities through food and education.

Phase I (April 30-November 1, 2017)

In the first phase of the program, Fellows connect with the food system as they live, work and study on the mountain farm campus in rural Highland County, Virginia. Fellows gain a full season of experience in sustainable growing methods, small animal husbandry, and rotational livestock grazing on a diversified farm. In addition, Fellows study topics such as permaculture design, whole foods preparation and preservation, wellness and nutrition, land stewardship, leadership, and community development through hands-on experience on the farm, expert guest instructors, field trips and daily educational sessions. Upon successful completion of their Phase I training, AMI Fellows receive a $1,000 stipend.

Phase II (January 1- December 31, 2018)

AMI Fellows apply their Phase I training as they work on community projects focused on building healthy communities through food and education. Working with AMI and other Partner Organizations, Senior Fellows build organizational capacity and launch new programs such as: building community gardens, developing school gardens and site-based curriculum, advocating for sustainable land use, and teaching nutrition and cooking for a healthy lifestyle. Supported by the AMI network, Senior Fellows continue to meet regularly for leadership and professional development. Fellows receive a monthly stipend of $1,500 (subject to payroll taxes) and a Permaculture Design Certificate upon successful completion of the year.

Applicants must be physically fit, able to lift 50 pounds, walk distances up and down steep hills, work outdoors for extended periods of the day, and be comfortable living and working communally as a team in a remote, mountain setting.

Applications are due by February 1, 2017 and are available at: www.alleghenymountaininstitute.org

For more information and questions, please visit www.alleghenymountaininstitute.org, the Allegheny Mountain Institute Facebook page or email us at info@alleghenymountainschool.org.

Allegheny Mountain Institute admits candidates of any race, color, gender, sexual orientation, religion or national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to Fellows. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, sexual orientation, religion or national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship programs, and other school-administered programs.

Wisconsin Idea Fellowships applications Are Now Open

The Wisconsin Idea is the driving mission to ensure that the education and research at UW-Madison is used to benefit communities beyond our campus borders.

Wisconsin Idea Fellowships are awarded annually to undergraduate student projects working towards solving a challenge identified along with local or global community partner. Fellowships are awarded to semester-long or year-long projects designed by an undergraduate student (or group of students) in collaboration with a community organization and a UW-Madison faculty or academic staff member.

Projects can receive up to $7,000 in total funding and students receive 3 academic credits. Student recipients are also invited to present their work at the Undergraduate Symposium in the spring semester.

On average, 5 – 10 fellowships are awarded every year. Two special fellowships each year are specifically dedicated to social entrepreneurship as well as the opportunity in gap in Madison.

Applications for Wisconsin Idea Fellowships open each year in late fall with selections made in mid-spring. 2017-18 applications are now open: Click here!

Click here to view 2016-17 Wisconsin Idea Fellowships projects

Funding for Foreign Language Study!

Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships & awards

Students are invited to attend upcoming information sessions & open houses to learn more about Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships and awards at UW-Madison.

FLAS fellowships are funded by the U.S. Department of Education and administered by the UW’s National Resource Centers to assist students in acquiring foreign language and area or international studies competencies.

The application for Summer 2017 and Academic Year 2017-2018 FLAS fellowships and awards will open on December 7, 2016.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the United States. Applications by students in professional fields are encouraged. Preference will be given to applicants with a high level of academic ability and with previous language training. The application deadline is February 13, 2017.

Please note that students can not apply for a FLAS to study Spanish, Chinese, Japanese or Korean. Only graduate students in professional schools can apply for a FLAS to study French or German.

For a full list of languages supported by FLAS, further details on eligibility, an FAQs page, and the online application please visit:

http://flas.wisc.edu

There will be two information sessions for students interested in applying for a FLAS award (please note different times for graduate & undergraduate applicants). The content of the December and January sessions will be identical; students need only attend one session:

Wednesday, December 7, 2016 (in 206 Ingraham Hall):
3:30 – 4:30pm for undergraduate student applicants
5:00 – 6:00pm for graduate applicants*

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 (in 206 Ingraham Hall):
3:30 – 4:30pm for undergraduate student applicants
5:00 – 6:00pm for graduate applicants*

*Graduating seniors who plan to be in graduate or professional school at UW next year should attend the session for graduate applicants.

In addition, there will be 2 open houses where applicants and interested students are welcome to stop by for additional information and with any questions about the awards, the application process, etc:

Tuesday, December 13,2016 (in 336 Ingraham Hall)
11:00am – 1:00pm

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 (in 336 Ingraham Hall)
11:00am – 1:00pm

Complete information on FLAS awards, eligiblity, these information sessions, and the application is all online at:

http://flas.wisc.edu